Search

Gregory Burgreen Phones & Addresses

  • 1821 Summertree Rd, Starkville, MS 39759 (662) 323-1007
  • 6044 Meadow Ln, Bakerstown, PA 15007 (724) 449-6399
  • Madison, AL
  • Allison Park, PA
  • Pittsburgh, PA
  • Norfolk, VA

Resumes

Resumes

Gregory Burgreen Photo 1

Gregory Burgreen

View page
Location:
United States

Publications

Us Patents

Magnetically Suspended Miniature Fluid Pump And Method Of Designing The Same

View page
US Patent:
6447265, Sep 10, 2002
Filed:
Sep 20, 1999
Appl. No.:
09/398878
Inventors:
James F. Antaki - Allison Park PA
Bradley Paden - Santa Barbara CA
Gregory Burgreen - Pittsburgh PA
Nelson Groom - White Marsh VA
Assignee:
The University of Pittsburgh - Pittsburg PA
The United States of America as represented by the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Washington DC
International Classification:
F04B 1700
US Classification:
417354, 417356, 4174231, 41742312, 415900
Abstract:
A rotary pump for pumping fluids through a patient having a housing with an internal region, a stator member and an impeller positioned within the housing and having impeller blades, wherein the impeller is magnetically suspended and rotated, and wherein the geometric configuration of the rotary pump is sized and proportioned to minimize stagnant and traumatic fluid flow within the rotary pump. The plurality of magnetic impeller blades are preferably rare earth, high-energy-density magnets selected from the group consisting of samarium cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron alloy.

Blood Pump Having A Magnetically Suspended Rotor

View page
US Patent:
6447266, Sep 10, 2002
Filed:
Apr 24, 2001
Appl. No.:
09/841223
Inventors:
James F. Antaki - Allison Park PA
Bradley Paden - Santa Barbara CA
Gregory Burgreen - Pittsburgh PA
Nelson J. Groom - White Marsh VA
Assignee:
University of Pittsburgh - Pittsburgh PA
The United States of America as represented by the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Washington DC
International Classification:
F04B 1700
US Classification:
417356, 604131
Abstract:
A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

Rotary Pump Having A Bearing Which Dissipates Heat

View page
US Patent:
6093001, Jul 25, 2000
Filed:
May 2, 1997
Appl. No.:
8/848980
Inventors:
Gregory W. Burgreen - Pittsburgh PA
James F. Antaki - Allison Park PA
Assignee:
University of Pittsburgh - Pittsburgh PA
International Classification:
F04B 1700
US Classification:
4174238
Abstract:
A rotary pump having a housing defining a flow path, a stator attached to the housing, a rotor which contacts the stator and rotates thereabout, a motor for rotating the rotor and semiconductor-based electronic components which draws the heat created by the frictional contact between the stator and rotor away from blood flowing through the housing. The rotary pump can be a centrifugal pump having a housing with a base plate, a rotor with rotor blades and a stator wherein the base plate and the rotor are shaped and proportioned such that blood is prevented from stagnating/collecting between the rotor blades and base plate.

Magnetically Suspended Miniature Fluid Pump And Method Of Designing The Same

View page
US Patent:
6015272, Jan 18, 2000
Filed:
Jun 26, 1996
Appl. No.:
8/673627
Inventors:
James F. Antaki - Allison Park PA
Bradley Paden - Santa Barbara CA
Gregory Burgreen - Pittsburgh PA
Nelson Groom - White Marsh VA
Assignee:
University of Pittsburgh - Pittsburgh PA
The United States of America as represented by Administrator of the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Washington DC
International Classification:
F04B 1700
F03B 1300
US Classification:
417356
Abstract:
A rotary pump for pumping fluids through a patient having a housing with an internal region, a stator member and an impeller positioned within the housing and having impeller blades, wherein the impeller is magnetically suspended and rotated, and wherein the geometric configuration of the rotary pump is sized and proportioned to minimize stagnant and traumatic fluid flow within the rotary pump. The plurality of magnetic impeller blades are preferably rare earth, high-energy-density magnets selected from the group consisting of samarium cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron alloy.

Blood Pump Having A Magnetically Suspended Rotor

View page
US Patent:
6244835, Jun 12, 2001
Filed:
Jul 19, 1999
Appl. No.:
9/356662
Inventors:
James F. Antaki - Allison Park PA
Bradley Paden - Santa Barbara CA
Gregory Burgreen - Pittsburgh PA
Nelson J. Groom - White Marsh VA
International Classification:
F04B 1700
US Classification:
417356
Abstract:
A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.
Gregory W Burgreen from Starkville, MS, age ~57 Get Report